SSI Newsletters: 1993 January February

Space Studies Institute Newsletter 1993 JanFeb cover

SPACE STUDIES INSTITUTE
P.O. BOX 82
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542
[[librarian note: This address is here, as it was in the original printed newsletter, for historical reasons. It is no longer the physical address of SSI. For contributions, please see this page]]

 

SSI UPDATE
THE HIGH FRONTIER® NEWSLETTER
VOLUME XIX ISSUE 1 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1993

 

FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

This issue is dedicated to you, our member. We hope that this Update will give an insight as to the views you share with other SSI members, who SSI is, who the staff is, what SSI’s plans are for the year as an organization and what the focus will be of the major 1993 research projects.

SSI began the self-examination process in October of 1991. Together with Dr. O’Neill, the Directors and Governing Members, the SSI staff began reviewing the goals, operations and abilities of the organization as a whole and by department.

 

The Poll

An important tool in the review process was the Gallup poll which was conducted in the Fall of 1992. The poll was designed by Mr. George Gallup, Jr. and his staff at the Gallup International Institute. Mr. Gallup is a Senior Advisor of SSI and was a personal friend of Dr. O’Neill. He graciously donated his time and that of his staff to create the poll and interpret the responses. The results are included in this newsletter. We gratefully acknowledge his assistance and expertise in this project.

The tremendous response rate (51%) makes the responses all the more valid. A response rate of 20% is necessary to have data that can be believed, the 51% rate leaves no doubt that the responses reflect those of the entire membership.

There was great support for SSI’s mission to open the high frontier of space, and to use space resources to benefit humanity. Space solar power, in particular, received high marks in each question where it appeared.

The results you see in this newsletter are the general responses. We have tabulations on each question which reflect the opinion based on type of membership, gender, age, number of years. with SSI, etc. The poll result document is ninety-six pages in length. A similar poll was conducted with former members. The results were amazingly close to that of the current membership.

 

Who is SSI?

SSI is a non-profit organization. It was founded in 1977 by Gerard and Tasha O’Neill for the purpose of opening the high frontier of space for the benefit of all humanity. The phrase “open the high frontier of space” comes from the book, The High Frontier, written by Dr. O’Neill in 1976. The book describes the wonders and benefits that industrial, self­-supporting space settlements can provide to humanity living on and off the planet.

SSI has a Board of Governing Members whose responsibility is to maintain the vision as described in the book and to elect a Board of Directors to carry out the work necessary to make that vision a reality.

SSI Board of Governing Members: Mr. James Burke, Prof. Freeman Dyson, Mr. W. Brandt Goldsworthy, Mr. David Gore, Ms. Bettie Greber, Mr. James Laramie, Mr. Gregg Maryniak, Mr. William B. O’Boyle, Ms. Tasha O’Neill, Dr. David M. Odom, Dr. Fred A. Rose, Dr. Lee S. Valentine, Mr. David Wine

 

The Board of Directors elects the corporate officers as well as the Board of Senior Advisors. The Directors of SSI regularly review SSI’s activities, and are responsible for overseeing all programs and financial affairs of SSI.

SSI Board of Directors: Dr. Joseph P. Allen, Mr. Junta Ayukawa, Mr. James Burke, Prof. Freeman Dyson, Mr. W. Brandt Goldsworthy, Mr. David Gore, Mr. Morris Hornik, Mr. Gregg Maryniak, Mr. William B. O’Boyle, Dr. Roger O’Neill, Dr. David M. Odom, Dr. Fred A. Rose, Mr. Burt Rutan, Dr. Lee S. Valentine

 

The Senior Advisors are elected by the Directors to provide expertise in an area of importance for either a brief or an extended period.

SSI Senior Advisors: Col. J. Paul Barringer, Mr. Richard Boudrealt,
Mr. Chris Faranetta, Mr. George Gallup, Mr. Richard Gertsch, Dr. Peter Glaser, Mr. James Harford, Ms. Kathy Keeton, Mr. Jeffrey Manber

 

All Board members and officers serve without compensation.

 

The Staff

The specific roles for the SSI staff are described below; however, in an organization with such a small staff there is much overlapping of responsibilities and cooperation among the staff. We are all able and would be happy to help you with any inquiry or request.

As Executive Director, I am the chief operating officer. As stated in the by-laws, the Executive Director is responsible for administration of the corporation’s office and activities; assists the President (Freeman Dyson), the Vice President (currently vacant) and the Executive Committee in carrying out business for the organization. In addition to these duties, I am also editor of the newsletter. I have been with SSI for over 12 years.

Barbara Faughnan serves as Membership Coordinator, Conference Coordinator and as Corporate Secretary. Barbara is responsible for maintaining the membership and Senior Associate records, initiates all notices, handles inquiries about the programs, and assists in the design of all membership programs.

As Conference Coordinator, Barbara is responsible for the planning and execution of all conference programs and activities and is the editor of the proceedings. Barbara has been with the Institute since the Fall of 1980.

Tracy Kenny is our librarian and archivist. Tracy has been with SSI for two years and is responsible for cataloging, abstracting and protecting all the documents in both collections.

In addition to these employees, SSI is fortunate to have committed volunteers, interns and occasional part-time assistants.

 

The Membership

The membership is currently 2,500. This is low because circumstances and finances did not allow us to do recruiting in 1991 or 1992. Of the current members, 785 are Senior Associates. Of the total membership, 189 reside outside the United States. Our goal is to boost membership to 4,000 by October of 1993, and thereby increasing our 1994 research budget alone by over $28,000. The current recruitment plan is to expand the membership base in the United States, but to focus more heavily than in the past on expanding world­wide. The benefits that space power and space settlements will provide will be of interest worldwide, therefore it makes sense to have a membership base that is also global in nature.

SSI may be small in numbers at this time, but it is a very effective force. Dr. O’Neill was always proud that SSI was able to conduct meaningful research with a relatively low budget and small staff. He often referred to SSI as “the lean, mean research team.” SSI was founded on the philosophy that a small (compared to government) organization can make decisions on what technologies should be developed, and conduct the research necessary to develop and prove technology efficiently and effectively.

 

The Budget

The 1993 budget is estimated at $275,000. This is subject to change depending on fundraising results and fluctuations in costs. The income is expected to be $85,000 from Senior Associate pledges, $68,000 from new and renewing members, $27,000 in special gifts from Senior Associates and Members, $27,000 in Conference registrations, and $69,000 from outside sources and joint contracts.

Outflows are estimated at $27,000 for the Conference, $90,980 for programs, $162,591 in operations, outreach and administration, and $32, 100 in membership services. Please note that no overhead is charged to any program (educational or research), or activity (conference or membership service); all overhead and administrative costs are covered in the operations budget.

Operations include all salaries, taxes, rent, insurance, phones, accounting fees, legal fees, travel, supplies, equipment, shipping, postage, fundraising, etc. incurred with the operation of the Institute.

The Program budget includes expenses paid for researchers, research or educational equipment, materials and other direct costs.

The Conference budget includes all expenses associated with hosting the conference and publishing the proceedings; it does not include, for example, Barbara’s salary as Conference Coordinator, which is covered under operations.

Membership services covers the newsletter and any other materials provided to the Senior Associates or Members during the year.

We are hoping to increase our research budget by $76,000 this year.

During the next several months, the Directors and staff will be attempting to raise these much needed funds. Since all the operational and servicing costs are already provided for in the 1993 budget, each new dollar raised from either new sources or from increased giving from existing donors will be applied directly to the critical programs and activities of the Institute. Please consider this when making your renewal or special gift to SSI. Together we can make 1993 the most successful and productive year in the history of SSI.

Bettie Greber

 

 

GALLUP POLL RESULTS

1993-2008

Question: How likely or unlikely do you believe each of the following will happen within the next 15 years?

Civilians will be traveling in space on a routine basis.

10% Very likely
28% Somewhat likely
29% Somewhat unlikely
33% Very unlikely

 

People will be living and working in space for periods of two years or more.

20% Very likely
43% Somewhat likely
27% Somewhat unlikely
11% Very unlikely

 

Interest will increase in using space-based technology will help the Earth’s environment.

61% Very likely
33% Somewhat likely
6% Somewhat unlikely
1% Very unlikely

 

Interest will increase in using space-based technology as an energy resource.

42% Very likely
42% Somewhat likely
13% Somewhat unlikely
2% Very unlikely
1% Did not respond

 

 

Space Studies Institute Newsletter 1993 JanFeb image 1 Bernal Sphere Colony

SPACE COLONIES

Question: How interested are you in personally in each of the following as topics to explore through research by SSI? (On a scale of 1-5, 1 = Very interested, 5 = Not at all interested.)

Supporting space colony research for tourism and recreation.

17% Very interested
15% 2
32% 3
21% 4
14% Not at all interested

 

Supporting space colony research for survival of the human race.

46% Very interested
21% 2
18% 3
9% 4
6% Not at all interested

 

Supporting space colony research for preser­vation of the Earth’s environment.

42% Very interested
29% 2
18% 3
6% 4
4% Not at all interested

 

Supporting space colony research for establishing a base for space operations.

72% Very interested
21% 2
50% 3
1% 4
5% Not at all interested

 

Question: How successful has SSI been during the past three years in supporting the following projects? (on a scale of 1-5, 1 = Very successful, 5 = Not at all successful.)

Space colony research to further space exploration.

10% Very successful
30% 2
31% 3
15% 4
6% Not at all successful
9% Did not respond

 

Space colony research for tourism and adventure.

1% Very successful
4% 2
21% 3
31% 4
33% Not at all successful
1O% Did not respond

 

Space colony research for survival of the human race.

4% Very successful
14% 2
31% 3
26% 4
15% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Space colony research to preserve the Earth’s environment.

5% Very successful
23% 2
34% 3
19% 4
9% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Space colony research for establishing a human base for space operations.

12% Very successful
31% 2
28% 3
14% 4
5% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Question: In the next three years, what priority should SSI give the following projects? (On a scale of 1-5, I = High priority, 5 = No priority.)

Support for space colony research for tourism and recreation.

7% High priority
10% 2
24% 3
26% 4
31% No priority
2% Did not respond

 

Support for space colony research for survival of the human race.

31% High priority
22% 2
20% 3
14% 4
11% No priority
2% Did not respond

 

Support for space colony research for preservation of the Earth’s environment.

39% High priority
29% 2
18% 3
7% 4
5% No priority
2% Did not respond

 

Support for space colony research to establish a human base for space operations.

63% High priority
24% 2
8% 3
3% 4
1% No priority
1% Did not respond

 

 

Space Studies Institute Newsletter 1993 JanFeb image 2 SPS

SOLAR POWER SATELLITES

Question: How interested are you personally in each of the following as topics to explore through research by SSI? (On a scale of 1-5, 1 = Very interested, 5 = Not at all interested.)

Supporting solar power satellite research for alternative energy sources.

69% Very interested
20% 2
7% 3
3% 4
1% Not at all interested

 

Supporting solar power satellite research for powering space flights.

47% Very interested
26% 2
20% 3
5% 4
2% Not at all interested

 

Supporting solar power satellite research to benefit developing countries.

35% Very interested
25% 2
23% 3
11% 4
6% Not at all interested

 

Supporting solar power satellite research as a non-polluting energy source for Earth.

57% Very interested
24% 2
12% 3
4% 4
2% Not at all interested
1% Did not respond

 

Question: How successful has SSI been dur­ing the past three years in supporting the following projects? (On a scale of 1-5, 1 = Very successful, 5 = Not at all successful.)

Supporting solar power satellite research as an alternative energy resource.

14% Very successful
31% 2
25% 3
14% 4
5% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Supporting solar power satellite research to power space flights.

5% Very successful
16% 2
33% 3
23% 4
13% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Supporting solar power satellite research to benefit third world countries.

3% Very successful
9% 2
29% 3
29% 4
20% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Supporting solar power satellite research as a non-polluting energy source for Earth.

11% Very successful
28% 2
28% 3

16% 4
7% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Question: In the next three years, what priority should SSI give the following projects? (On a scale of 1-5, 1 = High priority, 5 = No priority.)

Supporting solar power satellite research as an alternative energy source.

65% High Priority
21% 2
8% 3
3% 4
2% No priority
1% Did not respond

 

Supporting solar power satellite research to power space flights.

33% High Priority
29% 2
23% 3
9% 4
4% No priority
2% Did not respond

 

Supporting solar power satellite research to benefit third world countries.

23% High Priority
24% 2
25% 3
14% 4
12% No priority
2% Did not respond

 

Supporting solar power satellite research as a non-polluting energy source for Earth.

61% High Priority
22% 2
9% 3
4% 4
3% No priority
1% Did not respond

 

 

Space Studies Institute Newsletter 1993 JanFeb image 3

SPACE TRANSPORTATION

Question: How interested are you personally in each of the following as topics to explore  through research by SSI?
(On a scale of 1-5, 1 = Very interested, 5 =  Not at all interested.)

 

Supporting space transportation research for inventing and promoting low-cost access to  space.

77% Very interested
16% 2
4% 3
1% 4
1% Not at all interested
1% Did not respond

 

Supporting space transportation research for low-cost transportation for materials to be used in space.

67% Very interested
23% 2
7% 3
1% 4
1% Not at all interested
1% Did not respond

 

Supporting space transportation research for tourism, recreation and adventure.

17% Very interested
19% 2
29% 3
20% 4
14% Not at all interested
1% Did not respond

 

Question: How successful has SSI been during the past three years in supporting the following projects? (On a scale of 1-5, 1 = Very successful, 5 = Not at all successful.)

 

Supporting space transportation research to invent and promote low-cost access to space.

11% Very successful
26% 2
28% 3
16% 4
9% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Supporting space transportation research for low-cost transportation for materials to be used in space.

16% Very successful
27% 2
25% 3
14% 4
8% Not at all successful
10% Did not respond

 

Supporting space transportation research for tourism and recreation.

2% Very successful
4% 2
23% 3
30% 4
30% Not at all successful
11% Did not respond

 

Question: In the next three years, what priority should SSI give the following projects? (On a scale of 1-5, 1 = High priority, 5 = No priority.)

Supporting space transportation for inventing and promoting low-cost access to space.

72% High priority
19% 2
5% 3
2% 4
1% No priority
1% Did not respond

 

Supporting space transportation for low-cost transportation for materials to be used in space.

62% High priority
25% 2
8% 3
3% 4
1% No priority
1% Did not respond

 

Supporting space transportation for tourism and recreation.

8% High priority
12% 2
24% 3
24% 4
30% No priority
2% Did not respond

 

SSI 1993-2003

Question: Thinking over the next ten years, how important do you feel that SSI should …

Be a space research facility.

71% Very important
22% Somewhat important
5% Not too important
0% Not at all important
2% Did not respond

 

Promote High Frontier ideas for space development.

68% Very important
26% Somewhat important
4% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Forward the goal of human habitation of space.

68% Very important
26% Somewhat important
4% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond
Lobby the federal government.

35% Very important
34% Somewhat important
21% Not too important
9% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Be a voice of influence at NASA.

45% Very important
37% Somewhat important
12% Not too important
5% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Educate the general public.

59% Very important
30% Somewhat important
9% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Educate scientists and engineers.

54% Very important
35% Somewhat important
9% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Be a voice in the environmental movement.

24% Very important
39% Somewhat important
10% Not too important
11% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Provide the technical information to scientists and engineers.

57% Very important
35% Somewhat important
6% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Write articles for the popular media.

47% Very important
40% Somewhat important
10% Not too important
2% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Raise funds for SSI research.

56% Very important
39% Somewhat important
3% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Aggressively recruit new SSI members in the USA.

45% Very important
43% Somewhat important
9% Not too important
2% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Aggressively recruit new SSI members outside the USA.

37% Very important
43% Somewhat important
16% Not too important
3% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

Be a “think tank” for researchers.

54% Very important
33% Somewhat important
11% Not too important
1% Not at all important
1% Did not respond

 

SENIOR ASSOCIATES

Questions for Senior Associates:

Please rate the overall program.

15% Excellent
60% Good
20% Only fair
3% Poor
2% Did not respond

 

Rate the information contained in the Confidential Newsletters to Senior Associates, would you say it is…

24% Very informative
41% Somewhat informative
9% Not too informative
1% Not at all informative
25% Did not respond

 

If SSI were to expand its Senior Associate benefits, which one would you choose …

40% More events such as conferences and seminars
50% More opportunities to participate in research programs
10% Did not respond

 

YOUR VIEWS

Question: Which of the following two statements is closer to your view?

A. Should focus primarily on its current mis­sion of promoting human habitation in space and using space resources to benefit Earth.

88%

B. Should focus primarily on the benefits of space-related research to environmental protection.

12%

 

Question: SSI is searching for a new president. Which one of the experiences listed below do you think would best prepare someone to head up SSI?

23% Aerospace industry leader
16% Business or industry leader
15% Well-known spokesperson
11% Experienced non-profit leader
11% Former astronaut
10% University professor
4% University administrator
4% NASA official
6% Did not respond

 

Question: For each of the following membership benefits, please rate them in terms of your overall satisfaction:

The book, The High Frontier.

44% Very satisfied
21% Somewhat satisfied
2% Somewhat dissatisfied
1% Very dissatisfied
31% Do not have
1% Did not respond

 

Access to technical information.

20% Very satisfied
36% Somewhat satisfied
8% Somewhat dissatisfied
2% Very dissatisfied
31% Do not have
3% Did not respond

 

The SSI VISA card.

3% Very satisfied
2% Somewhat satisfied
1% Somewhat dissatisfied
0% Very dissatisfied
91% Do not have
3% Did not respond

 

Question: Do you think the price of a regular (not Senior Associate) membership is…

2% Too high
88% About right
3% Too low
7% Did not respond

 

Question for members: Which statement best describes why you are not a Senior Associate …

23% I am not interested or would not use the benefits.
41%o I am interested, but the $100.00 per year for five years is too high
20% I never heard of the program.
12% Other reason
4% Did not respond

 

Question: Did you attend any of the ten SSI Princeton Conferences on Space Manufacturing?

10% Yes
89% No
1% Did not respond

 

If you did attend, how would you rate the conference(s) in terms of value to you? Would you say it was …

48% Excellent
39% Good
12% Only fair
1% Poor

 

Question: If SSI were to expand membership benefits, how interested would you be in the following:

Health care benefits.

8% Very interested
14% Somewhat interested
15% Not too interested
63% Not at all interested

 

Long distance telephone discounts.

7% Very interested
l5% Somewhat interested
l7% Not too interested
61% Not at all interested

 

Question: Recently SSI founded the Gerard K. O’Neill Memorial Library and Archives in Princeton. In the coming year how often do you expect to contact the library, either in person, by telephone or by modem connection? Would that be…

26% 1-3 times
2% 4-6 times
1% 7-9 times
2% 10 or more times
67% I do not plan to use the library
2% Did not respond

 

Question: Are you familiar with the SSI Research Matrix Strategy?

7% Yes
91% No
2% Did not respond

 

If you are familiar with the matrix, to what degree do you believe the matrix is an effective or ineffective strategy in assessing needed areas of space research.

29% Very effective
63% Somewhat effective
5% Somewhat ineffective
3% Very ineffective

 

SSI UPDATE:

The newsletter, SSI Update.

48% Very satisfied
45% Somewhat satisfied
5% Somewhat dissatisfied
1% Very dissatisfied
1% Did not respond

 

About the newsletter:

How often have you read all or part of the
newsletter in the past year? Have you read …

63% Every issue
28% Most issues
8% Fewer than half of the issues
1% Did not respond

 

The subjects of the articles interest me.

24% Always
67% Fairly often
6% Rarely
1% Never
2% Did not respond

 

Research projects arc explained clearly.

32% Always
61% Fairly often
5% Rarely
0% Never
2% Did not respond

 

I receive the newsletter on time.

55% Always
33% Fairly often
4% Rarely
0% Never
8% Did not respond

 

SSI Update gives me the inside track on SSI activities.

34% Always
49% Fairly often
12% Rarely
1% Never
4% Did not respond

 

It accurately depicts the progress of the High Frontier vision.

25% Always
51% Fairly often
17% Rarely
1% Never
6% Did not respond

 

The format is easy to read.

39% Always
48% Fairly often
10% Rarely
1% Never
2% Did not respond

 

ABOUT THE SSI MEMBERS

What is your current membership level?

65% Member
30% Senior Associate
5% Did not respond

 

How long have you been a member of SSI?

5% Less than one year
24% 1-3 years
28% 4-6 years
18% 7-9 years
12% 10-12 years
11% 13-15 years
2% Did not respond

Age:

-1% 17 or under
9% 18-29
38% 30-39
32% 40-49
10% 50-59
5% 60-69
4% 70-79
1% 80 or over
1% Did not respond

Gender:

91% Male
8% Female
1% Did not respond

 

Marital Status:

53% Married
37% Single
7% Divorced
2% Widowed
1% Did not respond

 

Are you retired:

9% Yes, retired
90% Not retired
1% Did not respond

 

Education:

-1% 8th Grade or less
-1% High school incomplete
2% High school complete
15% Some technical training or college incomplete
21% College complete
17% Some post-graduate work
29% Master’s degree
15% Doctoral degree
1% Did not respond

 

What is your primary occupation?

8% Academic
4% Scientist working in commercial industry
4% Scientist working for government or other non-profit industry
24% Engineer
8% Business Manager or owner
5% Technician
2% Writer/Author
22% Other professional
10% Other worker
3% Laborer, skilled or unskilled
1% Homemaker
5% Student
1% Unemployed
4% Did not respond

 

What is your total household income, per year, before taxes?

5% Under $5,000.00
3% $15,000-19,999
8% $20,000-29,999
9% $30,000-39,999
14% $40,000-49,999
12% $50,000-59,999
17% $60,000-79,999
9% $80,000-99,999
17% $100,000-or more
1% Student or retired with no income
5% Did not respond

 

What publication do you read on a regular basis?

41% Scientific American
38% National Geographic
31% Final Frontier
28% Discover
28% Smithsonian
24% Astronomy
23% Analog
16% Sky and Telescope
6% Sierra

 

Which areas are you interested in?

76% Science fiction
70% Astronomy
68% Current events
59% Environmental issues
59% History
58% Engineering
36% Geology
34% Participating in individual sports
33% Writing, non-fiction
30% Writing, fiction
29% Oceanography
27% Meteorology
15% Participating in team sports

 

COMMENTS MADE ON POLL RESPONSES

At the end of the poll was an open question, Is there something else you would like to tell us about your interest in space research, engineering, environmental protection, SSI or another related topic?

SSI received a 55% response rate on this question. After the polls were tabulated by an outside firm the original responses were returned to us. We then reviewed the written comments. The responses were generally in the following categories: Positive comments about SSI as an organization 40%; Comments describing a specific topic we should look into, or reports on research the SSI member is doing 25%; Positive and encouraging comments on solar power satellites 18%; SSI should do more public awareness activities 13% and Negative or specific problem resolution 2%.

It would take an entire newsletter to share all the comments with you, but we would like to share with you as many as space permits in this issue. A representation of each category is shown, however fewer from the specific focus segment are shown because most of these were long, detailed accounts which we cannot accommodate in this column. But we thought you would enjoy sharing some of the feelings and thoughts your fellow members shared with us.

“Keep up the good work. You (we?) have an uphill fight to convince people that High Frontier ideas are not frivolous (or even obscene) before we solve all of our problems on Earth first. Of course your work will actually lead to solutions, but many of us are very short sighted.”

“When space travel moves forward again it will more suddenly. No one can foresee when or why it will happen. SSI should train and sustain those who will build the spacecraft and habitats. SSI should continue to do what it does best – developing means and methods for life and travel in space.”

“Is there any place I can send my resume to get advice or an evaluation on how a person with my particular qualifications can become actively involved in space research and space colonization? Supporting SSI just isn’t enough. I want to take an active role.”

“I am retired – retired but still want to keep up with progress and events – especially space related. SSI and the newsletter help.”

“I want to personally live in space, as soon as possible.”

“I believe that humankind’s future is in space and I support all efforts to achieve this future. I would dearly love to go myself and become a colonist!”

“Remain pure to the original High Frontier Concept.”

“Energy is vital! Space retrieval of solar energy must happen soon if we are to preserve the Earth.”

“Living/working in space should be an option for a person’s life. My main incentive for interest in space exploration, development, and settlement is concern for survival and evolution of our species. I personally like it here on Earth a lot, and don’t particularly want to go to space personally, except as a tourist, and after it’s as safe as commercial airline travel.”

“I like SSI’s get something done attitude and methods. Keep up the good work.”

“We need space to give us a frontier to direct our dreams and efforts. The social, technical, and environmental benefits are secondary. Chasing our dreams is the primary reason for space exploration. Space exploration will fuel those dreams.”

“I believe mankind’s most urgent goal should be the utilization and colonization of space and our solar system. Organizations like SSI are vital for setting goals and providing a ‘push’ to get man off the planet Earth as fast as possible.”

“Research and engineering are wonderful, but we are losing the battle for hearts and minds. We are being soundly defeated in the ninth inning, and ‘the fat lady’ has been seen entering the stadium. I cannot help but answer pessimistically the questions regarding anything the public will accept in space. In tighter economic times on Earth, money for anything in space is imminently vulnerable given this perception of irrelevance to common life. Speeches about spin-offs, and ‘planting seeds for tomorrow’ seem only to have anesthetized lawmakers and Americans at large to the potential benefits of space technology. If something radical is not done quickly to reverse this, nothing of substance will be done in space during our lifetimes. This indifferent public pays the bills and influences national policy.”

“Being a member of SSI is how I vicariously participate in and support our effort to get in space. I wish Princeton were closer to the West coast so I could get to some of the SSI sponsored events and see the O’Neill library. I think going into space is an important and long-term goal for humankind.”

“Please keep up the good work.”

“I think going to Mars makes almost no sense at this time. I very much want to support SSI though I have little time to be involved.”

“I think the ideas of privatizing the space industry, as well as more expansive global consortia devoted towards space exploration, should be vigorously advanced in the coming decade.”

“Am very interested in efforts to substantially reduce the cost of getting people into orbit.”

“I believe SSI has an obligation to send scientists to schools (middle and high school) to help educate our students. Make the transfer of understanding into the future!”

“So much of the process of going to ‘space’ seems to depend on the movement of huge institutions (Gov’t, NASA, major corps, etc.).”

“One of the best things about SSI is that it keeps alive the sense that individual pioneering spirit is still possible even (and especially) in space exploration. Perhaps the greatest thing SSI will ever do is inspire those few special individuals, who will find a path to ‘The High Frontier’ that we can all follow on our own!”

“The Earth itself should be viewed as the first of many possible space habitats. We need to learn to manage it well if there are to be any others in the future.”

“Please further the Space Power Satellite work to bring energy collection and transmission to Earth.”

“In my opinion, the most important work SSI is doing or has done is on the development of non-terrestrial resources including space solar power. The most important new item SSI should be doing is increasing their base of funds and members in order to do more of the good research supported in the past.”

“Keep the message in front of people – space is an economically viable frontier where there is boundless hope for a bright future for Earth­life.”

“Access to space and its resources isn’t happening fast enough!”

“Keep up your educational activities. Before America will commit itself to space, they must be educated about the benefits.”

“Offer a Space Studies college-level scholarship and you will dramatically increase your youth membership, and at the same time promote interest in the field at the research level.”

“SSI private donor base is good. Don’t waste effort courting the federal government for funds. It is a gridlocked bureaucracy with no leadership capabilities. There is grass roots interest in space development. If possible, (legal) have a public offering – sell stock for a long ranged business effort to develop SPS industry. People would look on it primarily as a contribution but with possible big payback 20 or 30 years down the road if SSI perseveres.”

 

“The knowledge gained from space research should be used so that in the future, human habitation in space becomes a reality.

1) Put more emphasis on closed-biological life-support systems, and earthly spinoffs.

2) Have a space-manufacturing conference in a different city every even year, in Princeton on odd years

3) Get connected with electronic mail”

 

“I think SSI is doing well in its chosen modes of operation, but if we really want to increase public support for our approach to utilization of space resources, we need to increase public education about our research, and public outreach to recruit more interested members. Basically we need more PR – this will also generate more funds to support our research (right now it feels too much like an exclusive club). Perhaps the key is tying what we want to do in space to the beneficial environmental impact we would have on Earth. Also, SSI
Update could be made a lot better, eg. a “letters to the editor” section for member feedback.”

“Wish more could be done to get the message to everyday people. Pursuit of SPS would be a boon to the economy and environment.”

“One of SSI’s major goals should be to get its message out to as many people as possible more than in the past. Start with technical and
scientific people, then expand to the general public.”

“Need to develop political support for space­ based activities and economics!!”

“Push to get the space program out of the control of Congress and the Senate.”

“To get the public behind a strong exploration policy, access cost must decrease and a ‘boon’ to mankind (like solar power satellites) to  relieve tensions and protect the environment should be developed right now. Space exploration is considered to be, by some, a low priority for mankind with its monies best spent
elsewhere.”

“The job of SSI is research not PR.”

“While emphasis on humans in space is necessary for the future, I believe your rare attention to planetary spacecraft is disappointing.”

“I am not aware of the library or of a means to access complete technical reports on part SSI-sponsored research. Short summaries in the newsletter do not completely satisfy my interest.”

“Keep up the good work.”

“What you are doing, the focus of developing space colonization and its interplay with earth, is the most important work going on on our planet. If the idiots in the White House weren’t so primitive, they would be able to understand that they could put the entire planet to work by developing your ideas to their fullest extent. Please press on at all costs.  I will increase support as I can.”

“I don’t entirely agree with Gerard O’Neill’s vision and optimism on the High Frontier, although I agree there is much potential to space exploration. I belong to SSI because it does an excellent job supporting research and distributing information in ways a  bureaucracy like NASA can’t.”

“Yes – get us back on the moon. Space station is a waste. I know – I retired from NASA after 30 years!”

“Leadership is critical. Vision must be communicated. Public education (including Congress) is currently insufficient.”

“Space is one of my favorite dreams.”

“Focus on exciting school kids for the future. They will drive public opinion someday!”

“I’d like to see more work done in human behavior studies related to the health of the ecosphere.”

“Would like more concentration/effort on cheap transportation to low Earth orbit.”

“The public wants to see solid benefits, tangible financial benefits, come from space – after that, of course, adventure and a sense of high purpose.”

“Develop and support low cost access to LEO. All other possibilities key off this capability. Asteroid survey, etc. is worthwhile as a motivating factor to drive the above.”

“Please assist in allowing civilians in space before I’m too old! More missions to Mars (manned) and the Moon would be nice.”

“There are already enough lobbying organizations out there. SSI should concentrate on providing hard research on subjects that will make a real difference (such as the mass driver, lunar key resources).”

“I’m intensely interested in the chemical composition and uses of nonterrestrial substances.”

“Human function in space.”

“Interested in space tourism, recreation and habitation – and the effects thereof on future humans.”

“SSI should concentrate on the development of a Lunar Industrial Base. This is near term and is necessary to create space colonies.”

“I feel that it is critically important to the future of the Earth to construct and maintain a manned lunar base.”

“We need to do research based on an expanded view of reality, taking into account the existence of such things as the affect of consciousness and its role in the universe.”

“We need more coordination between ‘space interest’ groups.”

“I believe the development of space should now move to funding by industry/private sources. To count on Congress for future funding/leadership is foolish.”

“Clean energy – satellite solar power – is probably the most important issue here. Environmentally sound, it could immediately stop use of fossil fuels, make electric cars and trains feasible, and cause a huge oil company lobby uproar.”

 

 

SSI’S PLAN FOR 1993

SSI will continue to conduct activities in research and education over the next year. Specifically over the next six months SSI will:

• Hold the conference from May 12-15 here in Princeton – we urge you to attend. A registration package is enclosed with this newsletter. SSI will be publishing a monthly press release relating to its research program as well as the conference; if you see an article on SSI in your area, please clip it and send it to our office for our files.

• Representatives from SSI will brief the Clinton Administration on SSI’s activities and thoughts on an alternative space policy as set forth in the paper, “An Alternative US Space Program, ” written in 1990 by Gerard O’Neill. If you would like a copy of the paper, please send $5 for postage and copying to SSI, and we would be happy to send it to you.

• We will be placing articles in the popular media about the benefits of solar power satellites. A model article appeared in the January, 1992 issue of TRILOGY and was reprinted in the May/June 1993 issue of Update. The concept of power generation in space is one that is well received once it is understood.

• We will be seeking funding from outside sources to reprint The High Frontier. The High Frontier is central to SSI’s philosophy and programs. We hope to distribute the book to schools and libraries throughout the country.

• SSI will establish a volunteer force. Some opportunities for members and Senior Associates are listed below.

• Membership expansion will be another key effort over the next six months. If we are to be an effective force in shaping space development, we must grow in numbers and strength.

 

 

THE 1993 RESEARCH PLAN

The SSI Board of Directors recently approved a $30,000 budget for SSI research. The specific projects cannot be discussed at this time and will be announced in the next newsletter, as we are currently negotiating the contracts. As always, they will focus on location of materials, transportation of materials, processing of materials, and technologies necessary to implement solar power satellites.

The Board of Directors will also be developing a list of projects in the $10,000 to $25,000 range to be considered for sponsorship over the next two years. This range of support is what SSI can best commit to. The projects that will be considered are those which are critical to opening the high frontier, but which no one else is doing. This type of sponsorship is typical of the type that SSI has always valued most. All projects will concentrate on materials and processing with solar power satellites as one of the ultimate goals.

Larger and jointly sponsored projects will continue to be a possibility as the Directors consider which areas of research are critical for further advancement. However, these projects are more difficult to initiate in these times of economic cutbacks in the aerospace industry.

SSI will also host a workshop with Peter Glaser and William Brown which will be attended by several SSI Directors to discuss what technology must be developed before solar power satellites could be implemented. We will then try to incorporate as many of the projects as possible into our plan for 1993 and 1994. This together with our educational efforts to familiarize the general public and government officials with solar power satellites should be an effective program to win support for this important energy alternative.

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We need your help! To succeed in achieving the 1993 goals, we need your assistance!

SENIOR ASSOCIATE AND MEMBER PARTICIPATION

There are opportunities for Senior Associate and Member participation in SSI activities. Existing opportunities are outlined below. As new opportunities arise, we will publish them in the newsletter.

 

Research:

Several research projects will be undertaken over the next two years by SSI Senior Associates. The specific projects, scope and timing will depend on availability of qualified individuals. If you have knowledge of low pressure atmospheres (2.5-3 psi) for studies of combustion, plant growth, or animal growth; simulation of mining operations, construction methodologies; production of ceramic materials; or linear programs for buildup of SPS production infrastructure, and would like to consider helping with an SSI-sponsored research project, please send a resume and indicate the possible time you might have for the project to SSI. We will attempt to form research teams within the same geographic areas. This format has been a very valuable asset to SSI in the past (and a rewarding experience for the individuals involved).

 

Library and Archive:

Internships are available throughout the year to assist in sorting, preserving, and data entry of archive and library documents. For more information, please contact the SSI office.

 

Matrix:

Assistance is needed in providing abstracts and other useful information to fill the Matrix (described in the September/October 1992 issue of Update.) To assist with this project, or to request more information, please write: The Space Information Matrix, c/o Carole Hornik, xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, Washington, DC 20008.

 

Lectures:

Volunteers are needed to make presentations and conduct demonstrations in your local area. SSI receives many requests during the year for lectures, presentations and demonstrations. Our limited budget does not allow us to travel without cost to the host. If you would Like to volunteer to do presentations in your local area, we will provide you with audio visuals, scripts if needed, and demonstrations. This is an important area in which you can help educate and inform the public about SSI. For more information, or to sign up, please contact our office.

 

Developing Visuals:

SSI has a constant need for visuals. Slides, models, and artwork are all needed, but are not in the 1993 budget. If you have the ability to help us in this area, please contact our office.

 

Writers:

As part of SSI’s educational and outreach programs, we would like to place articles about SSI and its research programs in popular magazines. If you are a writer and would like to help SSI in this area, please contact our office.

 

Economists:

SSI needs to develop economic models for several research areas. If you would Like to assist in this area, please contact the SSI office.

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PBS SPECIAL FEATURING O’NEILL TO AIR MARCH 31

A PBS special, Living and Working in Space, featuring the last interview conducted with Gerard O’Neill will air on Wednesday, March 31 (please check local listings for time).

The special is a program that was produced along with a classroom series on space and the future. Dr. O’Neill is featured in many of the segments, including those on space, transportation and energy.

The special is hosted by Jaime Escalante, the celebrated math teacher of the film, Stand and Deliver. The special opens the door to the abundance of opportunities for today’s youth to live and work in space. It also encourages students to study more in the math and science fields in order to cope in a technology-based society.

Dr. John Lewis of the University of Arizona, the co-chair of the Transportation Session of the upcoming conference is also featured.
The program is for all ages; we encourage you to view it with your family.

 

©space studies institute

NEXT: 1993 March-April (Senior Associate Peter Glaser and GKO’N on SPS)

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Technology for Human Space Settlement