President Hudson on The Space Show tomorrow morning

SSI President Gary Hudson
SSI President Gary Hudson

[[UPDATE: If you missed the show… you didn’t!  To hear/download this Space Show episode with Gary, read the details and even make comments, you can click this link.]]

Tomorrow, Friday October 14th, at 9:30am pacific/12:30pm eastern, SSI President Gary C Hudson will be making his seventh appearance on Dr. David Livingston’s The Space Show.  The special emphasis of this broadcast will be the latest information on SSI’s Exotic Propulsion Initiative.

Taking place just weeks after the Breakthrough Propulsion Workshop in Estes Park, Colorado, this should be a very interesting discussion on this controversial technological subject.

It’s going to be a live show with Gary on the phone and you’ll be  invited to call in or email your questions on this important topic – or any other SSI projects.

To visit the Space Show page for this broadcast, click here.

For the page in information on Listening Live to The Space Show, click here.

Making Starships and Stargates by Dr. James Woodward
Making Starships and Stargates by Dr. James Woodward

If you’re new to the concepts of Advanced “Exotic” Propulsion, you can check out The Space Show’s archived presentation of the September 18th episode that featured taped interviews from AIAA Space 2016 with Steve Jolly, Tim Cichan, Dr. James Woodward, Dr. Heidi Fearn and John Hunt .

 

Plus, we just uploaded this new video to the SSI YouTube Channel: Gary’s opening remarks from the Estes Park Workshop.

[SSI and the organizers of the 2016 Breakthrough Propulsion Workshop are diligently working on the rest of the videos and the printed proceedings.  More information on the official release schedule will be coming soon!]

 

2 thoughts on “President Hudson on The Space Show tomorrow morning”

  1. Have you discussed at all what Elon musk is aiming to do with his mars INITIATIVE ??? also are you supporting him in any way ??

    thank you
    Damian

    1. Hi Damian, thanks for the note. You ask a valid question and here’re some of my own personal thoughts.

      Short comment:
      Anyone and everyone who is “bending tin,” as Harry Stine called it, building actual things that will help “The Human Breakout into Space” is part of “The Vision” and we should all do what we can to encourage them and give them support as we are able because the work is hard and very expensive and, honestly, the vast majority of living humans think that it’s all completely silly. It’s tough to get up every single morning and go to work when the weight of a world’s laughter seems to be doing its darndest to make you give up.

      Longer comment:
      The Space Studies Institute, being made up mostly of optimistic people and totally of “Space people” definitely supports the hard work of Elon Musk and the teams at SpaceX, just as we support the teams at Blue Origin, Masten, Boeing and ALL of the teams working on real hardware that will at some point add up to offering regular people the option to expand their lives and their families beyond the cradle that humans are currently limited to.

      Mars is Mr. Musk’s long-time personal passion. Several years ago, before he became the face of Mars to the whole world I met him at a Mars Society conference and he had already fully proven that he was putting his money where his mouth is. I respected that, as we all should. I’m quite confident that Mr. Musk and the teams at SpaceX *ARE* going to be historically linked to the first humans attempting to live indefinitely on Mars. His team’s efforts are to be commended and I think that all people should look at them and be proud that such dedication and focus is possible from fellow human beings. It’s an example that all of us should attempt to follow the best we can.

      Remember though, there are other people who also have life-long passions and ideas with potentials and who are putting real hardware behind their desires. Their focus is not Mars, however, it’s the Moon. We all should be proud of them also and offer our support in the ways that we all can.

      That all said, I must remind you of the famous quote by the founder of The Space Studies Institute: Gerard K. O’Neill:

      “Is a planetary surface – *any* planetary surface – really the best place for an expanding technological civilization?’

      After a person passes through their days of initial excitement in Space topics, wonder-filled excitement born out of adventure stories with heroes visiting and exploring strange alien worlds, that simple question is truly one that deserves fair, honest, adult contemplation. Some folks who have done that contemplation and who have considered the big picture and planetary options through their possible paths have found that fighting our way out of a gravity well just to climb down another gravity well… and down into another location that is not controllable, where once again humans will be just as much at the mercy of big falling rocks and weathers and environmental dynamics sent as-if by gods against which they can only hunker in and hope (just like staying on Earth) may not be the best idea after all.

      It is SSI’s humble – but seriously considered – opinion that jumping from one planetary surface to another – or from one surface to beneath the surface of another – is not necessarily the best option for everyone. And a significant amount of research has, for over a generation, shown that *creating* a habitat worth living and working in is not only possible but do-able using technologies that Science and Engineering have already modeled, tested and proven.

      If you believe that Mars is the best place to be then I hope that you are working on it personally with all of the passion you can feel. I love Robert Zubrin, he’s a hoot and a speaker no less amazing than Dr. Billy Graham but more than all that he’s an Engineer and he believes in building real things. That’s the way to be. Now, if your idea of perfection is the Moon or Phobos or Enceladus or some ExoPlanet and if you are personally making something – anything at all – physical that will assist human families to one day call one of those places home then that is just as great and honorable. Find a crew of like minded builders and we’d love to see your stuff (SSI has a history with making real Lunar hardware, remember, and we go way back with Asteroids).

      And if you ponder that simple question above and come to the view that the places between the rocks, places where folks can choose their own environments and make them real around them and even move them out of harm’s way or even point them wherever they want to go is, instead, the best place for your brain and muscle power then look around the SSI site to see what’s been done already and what you can pitch in and add to the work.

      Everyone remembers Heinlein for his phrase “Pay it forward”, I wish they’d also remember that he said “Specialization is for insects” :-). “Space” work shouldn’t be an either/or proposition. Most likely the tech created by all of the workers who set their personal sights on all the different locations will end up creating the whole, as parts of one will fill in gaps on others. It would be a shame if Space living – or “other-planet living” as is the case of Mars or a moon – didn’t happen simply because a “Mars guy” didn’t consider the potentials of the work being done by a “Moon gal” or if an “O’Neill Islander” didn’t consider a gain that was made by a Startravel physicist.

      When you really think about it, pretty much everything has potential to play a part in SSI’s goal of The Human Breakout Into Space. Pick your own personal passion and build a part of it and let us see it.

      Support is good, building is best. Which is why SSI is so fond of the old phrase:

      “Make something. Make The High Frontier!”

      (To get a fast background on the core historical interests of SSI please view the High Frontier Overview video on the Space Studies Institute YouTube Channel, it’s only 12 minutes long.)

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