Category Archives: News

Two great Summer Gatherings

Two summer gathering alerts from SSI Senior Associates John Jossy and Tom Valone!

From SSI SA Thomas Valone, PhD, PE, President of the Integrity Research Institute:

‘It was a joy to have Gerard sign my copy of The High Frontier in the 1970s and gratifying to see his institute still in business.

This summer the Ninth International Conference on Future Energy (COFE9) will be held in Albuquerque NM on July 28-29, 2017 in parallel with the ExtraOrdinary Technology Conference in the same Embassy Suites Hotel. We also feature Breakthrough Propulsion speakers and are currently funding TWO breakthrough propulsion projects by previous presenters.

For more information please visit www.futurenergy.org ‘

 

And from SSI SA John Jossy:

‘This August Icarus Interstellar is holding their Starship Congress in Monterey, California. The event, held every other year, is dedicating this meeting to focusing on lunar space infrastructure development. Icarus Interstellar’s mission is to support the basic research needed for humankind to reach the stars. But first things first. The focus of this year’s conference poses the question: “How can we hope to gain experience living, building and working off planet without systematically capitalizing on our nearest, most accessible celestial body?”

Day one will examine the moon as a stepping-stone to the planets, and ultimately the stars. The presentations will explore all aspects of lunar colonies. For example lunar city planning, lunar resources, construction, power, water, radiation shielding, living and working, economy, sociology. In addition, planetary, deep space and interstellar exploration with the Moon as a centerpiece will be examined through discussions of spacecraft shipyards, lunar space elevators and deep space remote sensing telescopes.

The second day will look first at massive space access systems. This will include cis-Lunar transport vehicles, global logistics, tourism, legal and safety considerations and military presence. The topic of “Children in Space” will then be explored covering youth space education programs, people with disabilities in space and answer the question “When will we send the first child to space?” The philosophy behind solving this problem is that when it is safe for children to go there, it will be much more desirable for all people to travel to the moon!

The third day will address large-scale space based infrastructure and cultural needs. The former topic will address technology needed to support space and lunar industry such as space stations, mining facilities, telecommunications, zero gravity and lunar gravity manufacturing technology development. The cultural aspects include space arts, sports, community and culture; that is, everything not considered infrastructure, but which is necessary for humans to live and prosper on the Moon and in space.

A presentation on this third day will be made by Kim Holder, creator of Moonwards, a website depicting a virtual colony on the Moon. Moonwards attempts through engineering rigor and 3D simulation, to visualize a large-scale settlement by a group of nations collaborating to colonize the Moon, basing their design decisions on technical and economic merit. Immediately after the presentation, a panel discussion is planned moderated by Dr. David Livingston, host of the Space Show. The panel will feature Dr. Haym Benaroya, professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Rutgers University, Kim Holder, and myself. You can visit Moonwards at www.moonwards.com .

Starship Congress 2017 is happening August 7-9 at the Hyatt Regency in Monterey, California. You can find more information with links on how to register here:

http://www.icarusinterstellar.org/pages/starship-congress-2017 ‘

 

Thanks Tom and John for sharing this great information!

 

SSI NIAC June 2017 Update from President Gary Hudson

SSI President Gary Hudson
SSI President Gary Hudson

 

Good Morning SSI Associates!

I wanted to personally give you this quick update on the Space Studies Institute Exotic Propulsion Initiative:

Earlier this month, several members of the SSI NIAC study team attended the NASA NIAC kickoff event in Washington, D.C. Besides delivering a short “elevator pitch” presentation, Professor Heidi Fearn and Drs. Marshall Eubanks, Bruce Long and José Rodal also presented a poster and slides which we’ve made available for download at the bottom of this post.

We’re now about twenty percent of the way along our study, and as we proceed we’ll provide progress reports on both the experimental, theoretical and conceptual probe work being undertaken.

Thank you very much for your personal support!

– Gary

The SSI NIAC team in DC
The SSI NIAC team in DC. l-r:  Dr. Jose Rodal, Professor Heidi Fearn, Dr. Marshall Eubanks and Dr. Bruce Long
SSI NIAC 2017 Overview Poster
SSI NIAC 2017 Overview Poster (click to show larger)

For your copy of the DC Kickoff presentation slides PDF click here !


For more information on the SSI Exotic Propulsion Initiative, including links to the full set of videos from the 2016 Breakthrough Propulsion Workshop, see the main project page on SSI.org.

Don’t forget, only with your personal support and generous contributions can we continue to turn great engineering ideas into positive realities.

SSI is working today on The High Frontier.  Join us!

NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts

SSI Exotic Propulsion 2017 NIAC Phase I Award

SSI President Gary Hudson

From Space Studies Institute President Gary C Hudson:

 

I’m very pleased to announce that an SSI proposal, under the leadership of Principal Investigator Heidi Fearn at CalState University Fullerton, has been selected for a Phase I 2017 NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program award.

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-invests-in-22-visionary-exploration-concepts

Several of our colleagues (José Rodal, Paul March, Bruce Long, Nolan van Rossum and Marshall Eubanks) are Co-PIs or consultants. Prof. Jim Woodward will also consult on the project. SSI will administratively manage the grant for the team.

The Project Summary from our proposal:

We propose to study the implementation of an innovative thrust producing technology for use in NASA missions involving in space main propulsion. Mach Effect Thruster (MET) propulsion is based on peer-reviewed, technically credible physics. Mach effects are transient variations in the rest masses of objects that simultaneously experience accelerations and internal energy changes. They are predicted by standard physics where Mach’s principle applies – as discussed in peer-reviewed papers spanning 20 years and a recent book, Making Starships and Stargates: the Science of Interstellar Transport and Absurdly Benign Wormholes published by Springer-Verlag. These effects have the revolutionary capability to produce thrust without the irreversible ejection of propellant, eliminating the need to carry propellant as required with most other propulsion systems.

Our initial Phase 1 effort will have three tasks, two experimental and one analytical:

1. Improvement of the current laboratory-scale devices, in order to provide long duration thrust at levels required for practical propulsion applications.

2. Design and development of a power supply and electrical systems to provide feedback and control of the input AC voltage, and resonant frequency, that determine the efficiency of the MET.

3. Improve theoretical thrust predictions and build a reliable model of the device to assist in perfecting the design. Predict maximum thrust achievable by one device and how large an array of thrusters would be required to send a probe, of size 1.5m diameter by 3m, of total mass 1245Kg including a modest 400 Kg of payload, a distance of 8 light years (ly) away.

Ultimately, once proven in flight and after more development, these thrusters could be used for primary mission propulsion, opening up the solar system and making interstellar missions a reality. The MET device is not a rocket, it does not expel fuel mass, and does not suffer from the velocity restriction of rockets. Freedom from the need to expel propellant means very high velocities might be achievable simply by providing electrical power and adequate heat rejection for the drive system. A mission to Planet 9 is possible in the near future using RTG power and thruster arrays. A future goal would be interstellar travel to the nearest exoplanet, within 5-9 Ly distance. A mission of this type might take 20 or more years using the MET thruster. Although the nearest exoplanet is 14 or so ly distance, more Earth-like planets are being discovered daily.

This aerospace concept is an exciting TRL 1 technology, ready to take the next step to providing propellantless propulsion, first in incremental NASA smallsat missions, but later enabling revolutionary new deep space exploratory capabilities beyond anything achievable by conventional chemical, nuclear or electric propulsion systems. This unexplored opportunity has been uniquely developed by our co-Principal Investigators, breaking new ground in both science and engineering. Finally, it is technically credible – if bold and unconventional – and is fully consistent with modern physics, having been demonstrated over ten years of careful laboratory demonstration and investigation.

NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts


For more information on SSI’s Exotic Propulsion Initiative, please see its SSI Program Page.

 

New on the SSI YouTube Channel: President Gary at the SVSC

SSI President Gary Hudson
SSI President Gary Hudson

Gravity: The Key to Life and Propulsion on The High Frontier.  Enabling Permanent Human Settlement On The High Frontier.

February 27th 2017 Space Studies Institute President Gary C Hudson spoke at the Silicon Valley Space Center/AIAA Tech Talk meeting in Santa Clara, California about two important SSI programs: G-Lab, the free flying reduced gravity spinner co-orbited with ISS and EPI, supporting fundamental R&D for true “Space Drives.”

It was a fascinating night and we hope that all SSI Associates will make the time to enjoy this video.

Many thanks to Dr. Sean Casey and Rick Kwan of the Silicon Valley Space Center, the AIAA-SF and the Santa Clara Hacker Dojo.